Pages Navigation Menu

Home Superstitions


Home Superstitions – Some Good Luck and Bad Luck to Consider

By Honey B Wackx

Home superstitions are prevalent from very ancient times. Everyone wants to bring good luck into their house and that the bad fortune should be thrown away from the house. There are some superstitions regarding the home atmosphere. Some of them are given below:

The perfect gift for a home warming occasion that can be given for good luck is the bread and salt, according to the German people. The door being the main entry of the house should have some good luck charms hung over it so as to bring good luck into the house.

It is said that entering the house from the back door for the first time brings ill luck to the family. If someone’s death is taking place or if a child is being born, the doors of the house should be left open so as to ease the happening that is taking place. This is also a very old superstition followed by the Romans.

One should never bring an old broom to a new house while shifting. This brings the bad luck along with it. It is bad luck to carry a hoe into the house. The landing of a swarm of bees is not good as it means the house will get burnt soon. The flying of a bird through the window indicates the coming of death in the family.

Seeing a grasshopper inside the home means good luck is knocking at your door very soon. Giving a knife as a gift at the occasion of housewarming means that the new neighbor will become your enemy soon. An evergreen fresh branch nailed to the new rafters ensures luck in the house. Always avoid sweeping over the threshold as it means sweeping away all the good luck out of the house.

Falling of a broom means someone is going to accompany you very soon. Sweeping out trash after sunset means a visit of a stranger to the house whereas dropping of a fork indicates visit of a man to the house. Some superstitions say that one should never change the beds on Fridays as it brings bad dreams. The presence of a frog also brings good luck to the home. To keep the witches away, rosemary should be planted at the doorsteps.

Keeping a horseshoe in the bedroom keeps nightmares away. In the same way, hanging of a horseshoe above the doorway also brings good luck. Hovering of a white moth over the house also means a death in the family. Keeping of shoes on the table means bringing bad luck into the house. The house can be protected from thunder and lightning by keeping mistletoe in the home.

Many people say that it is unlucky to open an umbrella inside the house. The sitting of a snake in the house again means a death in the family. Carrying a spade over the shoulder is another superstition that brings bad luck. There is yet another old belief that sprinkling of salt in and around the house keeps off evil spirits. One more superstition in the list goes that nails should never be nagged after the sunset. This also brings bad luck to the family.

So next time you enter your house think of these home superstitions and what they could mean to you, if anything.

Copyright © SuperstitionLane.com

Home Superstitions Questions


James asks…

Broken bottle superstitions?

I am usually not this clumsy, but within the past two weeks, I have broken three different bottles. Two of them were little make-up flasks (covergirl clean makeup, 110 classic ivory, if you wanted to know!), one about 15 days ago, the other last night. About an hour ago, I broke my new plant-mister which was an opalescent blue glass bottle with a pump on the top. I don’t know about you, but if there were any viable superstitions on this, I would be a bit worried! I looked it up online but I couldn’t find anything about broken bottles. Each time was an accident, each time dropped on a tile floor, if that matters any. Please help me out if you know anything about this! Thanks!

Suzi Q answers:

It’s different from land to land. In my country, there’s a saying, something like “shivers bring luck”/”don’t worry, shivers bring luck”.
It’s a bad omen in other places, tho. U take it as a lucky one, ok?





Paul asks…

house blessings?

I heard that burning sage in a new home will help release all negative energies from the home. I have also heard that there is a specific saint statue that you bury in your front yard to bring good luck and keep out ill will. I just can’t remember which one it is, does anyone know?

Suzi Q answers:

My wiccan friend burns sage
and my catholic friends bury St Joseph…..





Sharon asks…

What culture buries a statue in front yard of new home for good luck or blessings or for whatever reason?

We found one today buried in the front flower bed of our new home. We were out pulling up weeds and found it. Then reburied it because we were worried we had disturbed someone or something. Now we went back to show it to neighbors and it’s not there. WHERE DID IT GO?

Doll Face answers:

Probably more than one culture. I know Cajuns used to do that back in my Grandmother’s time because she told me about it.

Often they would bury a statue of St. Martha, patron saint of hospitality or St. Joseph, patron saint protector of families. They were supposed to bless the house.

Caveat: I doubt this was ever a practice condoned by the Church. It was more superstition than religious devotion.

I was about 12 when my family moved into a new house and I told my mom I was going to bury my St. Joseph plastic statue in the yard so he would protect us and my mom said “Dont. You. Dare.” 🙂





Susan asks…

St Joseph statue for home selling , good or bad luck for the new owners?

We just bought a house in Sept 08, the previous owners had buried St Joseph in the backyard. They came back to dig it up , but couldn’t find it. I even went out and dug up the yard looking for it too, no luck. But it seems since we’ve moved here, we’ve had lots of bad luck. I’ve heard it would be bad luck for the sellers if they didn’t dig it back up, but I think its the other way around. Anyone KNOW the real story?? Thanx

Doll Face answers:

The real story is that burying statues in your yard has zero effect on buyer OR seller, since it involves silly superstitions.

Bad luck happens. The presence in your yard of a little piece of wood or plaster doesn’t mean a thing.





Nancy asks…

I need to know what goes in the “good luck” bag for a new home, I know there is rice, bread, and I forgot the

I forgot what was in the bag, and what each item meant, HELP

Doll Face answers:

The salt is missing. There is a saying that “you have enough to put salt on the table”, meaning that you are managing economically. (because salt is usually not your top priority if you are not well off…)





Mark asks…

Any nice idea’s for a ‘new home’ verse?

Hi, im trying to find a nice verse to put inside a ‘good luck in your new home‘ card for two special friends. any ideas of what i could put?

Many Thanks

Doll Face answers:

I hope your new home brings you much joy and many great memories to come!





Richard asks…

What is a good housewarming plant for new home?

My in-laws are retiring today and moving into their brand new condo. I want to send them a good housewarming plant as a gift but I want the plant to have meaning beyond my well wishes. For instance, does an olive tree symbolize something? Does an orange tree, or just some regular green plant symbolize luck, health, happiness, etc…?

I know about the bamboo good luck plants but those are really tired and kind of boring. I want the plant to POP and have true meaning. Thank you.
OK, I suppose I should had mentioned that my in-laws live in Switzerland. They live about 30 miles east of Zurich, which is more valley like. It of course would be cold in the winter (snow) and very pleasantly warm in the summer, spring is great everywhere in Switzerland. The plant would most likely be on the balcony which from what I understand is quite large.

Doll Face answers:

Well… My first thought was a mother-in-laws tongue (sansevieria) but that would not be very nice would it!!! If you knew my mother in law you would understand! :{

Seriously though, an orange, olive or other fruit tree would probably not be a very good idea considering they need a tremendous amount of light during the winter and would need to be brought indoors, and although a wonderful thought, would be difficult to care for.

I would send something that is relatively easy to grow indoors and would thrive in the warmer months outside on the balcony. Nothing would be nicer than to retire and be *successful* as a gardener and provide them with an opportunity to think of you and your family everytime they look at or care for the plant!

Here are some suggestions, and by the way – they also help to improve air quality, what says health better than that!!

Schefflera (Brassaia Actinophylla) Sometimes called Umbrella Plant –
There are so many varieties of Schefflera that you will almost certainly find one that appeals to you and suits your home. She prefers medium light, but will produce a fuller and bushier foliage if you can provide bright filtered light through a south or west facing window. Schefflera grows best if you allow the soil to dry slightly between waterings, and protect her from drafts and temperature extremes.

Http://www.agraria.org/piantedavaso/schefflera.htm

Golden Pothos (Epipremnum SP.)
Here’s another plant that is especially effective at removing formaldehyde (which is found in building materials like carpet). Pothos vines carry lovely green heart-shaped leaves with gold or cream-colored accents. It doesn’t mind being neglected and is seldom bothered by pests. If you prefer a bushier look, just pinch off the tips from time to time. She does like to be watered regularly, but as with all plants, be careful not to over water.

Http://www.livingcreations.net/images/plant18_l.jpg

Similar to the pothos is the heart shaped philodendron

http://www.agraria.org/piantedavaso/philodendron.htm

And the “peace lily” (spathiphyllum) – which always reminds me of funerals… But that may just be me!

Http://www.agraria.org/piantedavaso/spathiphyllum.htm

Anything from the Draceana family would be nice –

http://www.agraria.org/piantedavaso/dracaena.htm

My absolute favorite is –

Petra Croton (Codiaeum Variegatum)
Incredibly easy to grow! Surprises you with vibrant hues of yellows, reds and oranges on the deep green foliage. Truly beautiful, and she such a unique plant! Sure to get some conversations going…

Http://www.livingcreations.net/images/plant8_l.jpg

I sincerely hope this helps! These plants should also be readily available at florists in Switzerland!

Best Wishes

Questions powered by Yahoo! Answers

 


More Home Superstitions

 

Share

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *